Tag Archives: Life

My Life in Ten Seconds: Designers John Targon and Scott Studenberg of Baja East

Meet Scott Studenberg and John Targon, the charismatic boys behind the next “It” label Baja East. The lifestyle brand embodies a cool global aesthetic that bridges inspiration from the Far East with the laid back ease from the West Coast and New York’s street sensibility (Gwen Stefani counts herself as a fan). And with New York Fashion Week fall/winter 2015 shows rapidly approaching, we got up close and personal with both designers, and had them answer a quick survey of questions that delve into their new collection (no spoilers, promise) and their personal lives—that takes all of 10 seconds to read.

What word describes your fall/winter 2015 collection?

Scott: Oasis.

John: Sun-bleached.

What are you listening to right now?

Scott: ’90s angst, like Collective Soul, Matchbox 20, Alanis Morissette, Foo Fighters, The Cranberries, Cheryl Crow.

John: K. Michelle.

Where did you go in preparation for your fall/winter 2015 collection?

Scott: I was inspired by my previous travels. We created a textile and knit inspired by this rug I bought in Marrakech that we bartered for 100 bucks.

John: The Rothko exhibit.

The last drink I had was…

Scott: “I Am Cozy” from Cafe Gratitude in LA

John: “Killer X” from Liquiteria

What job would you be doing if you weren’t a fashion designer?

Scott: A yoga instructor on a deserted island in Thailand.

John: Tae Kwon Do instructor.

Where would you go first in NYC if you were a tourist?

Scott: Sex and the City bus tour.

John: West Village.

What is your favorite work of art?

Scott: Ross Bleckner’s Hummingbirds in 2002.

John: “Frontier Fronting” by Delia Brown.

Who’s your favorite superhero?

Scott: Storm from X-Men. She can fly, control the weather, and has major hair and a major outfit. And she has great skin.

John: Batman.

What’s the first thing you do in the morning?

Scott: In New York, I immediately make coffee and gluten-free oatmeal and try not to speak to anybody before then. In LA, I go to the gym and read my emails on the elliptical or StairMaster.

John: Give my boyfriend a good morning kiss.

Who did you design your first piece for?

Scott: For us. We had these handwoven one-of-a-kind ceremonial skirts we sourced from Bali that we constructed into sleeveless Bajas.

John: For myself.

What’s your favorite quote of all time?

Scott: (Created with actual receipts) “Show me the receipts.” — Whitney Houston

John: “Hearts are wild creatures, that’s why our ribs are cages.”

RELATED: My Life in Ten Seconds: Designer Wes Gordon

Brad Pitt Turns 51! See His Life in Hair

Happy birthday, Brad Pitt! The three-time Oscar nominee and star of Fury turns 51 today. The actor and producer first stole our hearts in 1991, when he starred in his breakout film role in Thelma and Louise. Since then, the actor has demanded our attention for more than two decades, but for much more than just his smoldering good looks.

Following critically-acclaimed performances in Interview with a Vampire, 12 Monkeys, Fight Club, and later Mr. and Mrs. Smith, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, and Moneyball, the actor has become one of the most renowned and highest-paid players in Hollywood—in addition to becoming one of our most-watched celebrities.

RELATED: Brad Pitt Holds Down the Fort at the Unbroken Premiere for Chicken Pox-Stricken Angelina Jolie

Earlier this year, the father of six married longtime partner Angelina Jolie in a intimate ceremony in Chateau Miraval, France. Apart from their respective acting careers, the pair are active humanitarians and philanthropists, having started the Jolie-Pitt Foundation in 2006.

In honor of his birthday, take a look back at Pitt through the years and watch him go from a handsome newcomer to Hollywood’s number one leading (and, of course, ever-so-handsome) man.

PHOTOS: See Brad Pitt’s Transformation Through the Years

Cause Celeb: Amanda Peet Wants All Children to Have a Shot at Life by Getting Vaccinated

When Amanda Peet’s daughter, Molly, was just 8 months old, she contracted whooping cough, also known as pertussis. She had already received two of the three shots necessary to be fully immunized from this potentially fatal respiratory illness, which strikes 10,000 to 40,000 adults and children in the United States each year. For Peet, the situation was beyond terrifying. “She was sick–really, really sick–for six weeks,” she says (Molly, now 4, has fully recovered). The health scare reaffirmed Peet’s interest in advocating for vaccines around the world. She’d been vocal on behalf of smaller pro-vaccine organizations in the past but in 2012 was approached by the United Nations Foundation (UNF) to get even more involved. So last summer she traveled to kenya as an ambassador for their Shot@Life campaign, which offers free immunizations against illnesses such as measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) and polio. “Ever 20 second a child dies from a disease that could’ve been prevented by a vaccine that already exists,” says Peet.

For most people, vaccinations are just something doctors say you have to do, so you do it. Molly’s illness must have changed your perspective on their importance.

It did. It was particularly scary because we had potentially exposed a lot of our friends’ babies, who weren’t fully vaccinated yet. Thankfully, none of them caught it.

Are you surprised by the controversy surrounding vaccines in this country? 

It’s a very complicated and divisive issue. But in my family growing up, science was the thing. So I say what I always say: Look at the data. Talk to the scientists and researchers. Talk to pediatricians, biochemists, and vaccinologists. Don’t talk to people who don’t actually know what they’re talking about.

Is the pro-immunization movement working?

Domestically, yes. The fact that the 1998 study [linking the MMR vaccine to autism] was refuted was a huge turning point in the anti-vaccine fervor here. [The study was also retracted by the medical journal that originally published it.] But I’m still very concerned about the developing world, where children just don’t have access to vaccinations.

What took you to Africa with Shot@Life, and where did you focus your energy?

There was an outbreak of polio that required attention, so the first place we went was Nairobi. I went to some medical facilities where polio shots were being administered to children. Then we went southwest to Migori and visited a couple of villages that were also doing a polio campaign.

Is your impression that the communities understand the importance of vaccines?

We met a young boy whose mother and two siblings are blind. He had walked his little sister three miles to the community center to get immunized. The sense of communal parenting was an inspiration.

Are you optimistic that these diseases will get wiped out?

It’s so overwhelming. You feel like, God, I can’t do anything. How will we ever get this done? But they did it in India with polio. It was incredibly complicated, but they did it. So yes, I know we can do this.

–Kevin Hayes

For more, turn to page 96 of InStyle’s May issue, now available on newsstands and for digital download.